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Of Interest

2018-20 Key Strategic Issues List
Edited by LTC Charles A. Carlton.
For over a decade, the USAWC has published the Key Strategic Issues List (KSIL) to inform students, faculty, and external research associates of strategic topics requiring research and analysis. A subset of these topics, designated as Chief of Staff of the Army special interest topics, consists of those which demand special attention. The USAWC will address these as Integrated Research Projects and other research efforts. The USAWC in coordination with Headquarters Department of the Army (HQDA), major commands throughout the Army, and the joint and interagency community have developed the remaining Army Priorities for Strategic Analysis. The KSIL will help prioritize strategic research and analysis that USAWC students and faculty, USAWC Fellows, and external researchers conduct to link their research efforts and results more effectively to the Army's highest priority topics.


Hard Copy Online Ordering

If you would like to order a hard copy of any publication, for those limited publications where hard copies are available, see the information located on the right-hand side of the publication's page. You may download a digital copy of the selected work free of charge. Free download links for three different digital formats are available on the specific publication's page as well.

For out of stock publications and our new digital only publications, refer to the new GPO on-demand site. For a small fee, receive many prior publications. Click here to visit.


The Summer 2018 issue of Parameters is available online opens with a Special Commentary, “The Military as Social Experiment: Challenging a Trope,” by Jacqueline Whitt and Elizabeth Perazzo. They argue the use of terms such as social experiment does little more than obscure the issue of who gets to serve in the US military and why.


Recent Publications

Exit Strategy: Rule of Law and the U.S. Army

Dr. Shima D. Keene.
View the Executive Summary

This monograph highlights the importance of establishing effective and sustainable rule of law institutions and practices in post-conflict states, and describes how the U.S. Army could better achieve that goal as part of its strategy for withdrawal from conflict.



A Security Role for the United States in a Post-ISIS Syria?

Mr. Gregory Aftandilian.
View the Executive Summary

Syria has become one of the most vexing and complex problems for U.S. strategic planners in recent times. Currently, the United States has about 2,000 troops in the northeastern part of the country whose primary mission has been to aid the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), made up primarily of Kurds and some Arab tribesmen, to fight ISIS. The near total defeat of ISIS in Syria, especially with the fall of its so-called caliphate capital in Raqqa in October 2017, might seem to suggest that the military mission is coming to an end and, therefore, the United States should pull out its troops. Indeed, President Donald Trump stated publicly in late March 2018, that he wanted these troops to come home “very soon.” However, since that time, the U.S. President has backtracked from this statement after receiving advice from several of his top military advisers, including Defense Secretary James Mattis, some foreign leaders like French President Emanuel Macron and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and influential members of Congress, such as Senator Lindsey Graham, all of whom have recommended that the President keep these troops in Syria.



The Dual-System Problem in Complex Conflicts

Mr. Dr. Robert D. Lamb, Ms. Melissa R. Gregg.
View the Executive Summary

Conflict and fragile environments are increasingly complex and unpredictable, but the U.S. policy system itself is much more complex and unpredictable than most leaders appreciate. In this monograph, the authors argue that until we get a grasp on this “dual-system problem,” the United States will fall further and further behind in its strategic ambitions.

 

Impacts of Anti-Access/Area Denial Measures on Space Systems: Issues and Implications for Army and Joint Forces

Authored by Mr. Jeffrey L. Caton.
View the Executive Summary

The 2018 National Defense Strategy and National Space Strategy both reaffirm the vital interests that the United States has in the domain of space. However, space remains an inherently hostile environment that has become congested, contested, and competitive among the nations. What are ways for the U.S. Army to assure the success of its space-dependent warfighting functions in an anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) environment where space systems are degraded for significant periods of time?



Underestimated: Our Not So Peaceful Nuclear Future, Second Edition

Authored by Mr. Henry D. Sokolski.
View the Executive Summary

Underestimated: Our Not So Peaceful Nuclear Future, Second Edition explores what nuclear future we may face over the next 3 decades and how we currently think about this future. Will nuclear weapons spread in the next 20 years to more nations than just North Korea and possibly Iran? How dire will the consequences be? What might help us avoid the worst?



Radical Islamist English-Language Online Magazines: Research Guide, Strategic Insights, and Policy Response

Authored by Dr. Robert J. Bunker, Pamela Ligouri Bunker.
View the Executive Summary

This Strategic Studies Institute book provides a comprehensive research guide to radical Islamist English-language online magazines, eBooks, and assorted radical Islamist news magazines, reports, and pocketbooks published between April-May 2007 and November 2016, and generates strategic insights and policy response options.



Current Russia Military Affairs: Assessing and Countering Russian Strategy, Operational Planning, and Modernization

Edited by Dr. John R. Deni.
View the Executive Summary

What are the key strategic objectives, operational planning tenets, and force modernization goals of the Russian Federation? This collection of short essays includes the key insights and recommendations presented by featured speakers during a one-day, invite-only workshop conducted in Washington, DC on May 1, 2018 in support of U.S. European Command.


Expert's Profile
Every quarter we take the opportunity to highlight one of SSI’s researchers and the projects on which he or she is working. Today’s issue features Prof. William G. Braun, III.
WILLIAM G. BRAUN III is a Professor of Practice with the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI), U.S. Army War College (USAWC). Professor “Trey” Braun’s research agenda includes national strategy and policy analysis, land forces employment, military leadership, and military-society relations. He last deployed as the Director, CJ-7 (Force Integration, Training, and Education Directorate), Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan. His 30-year U.S. Army career included multiple tactical aviation and planner assignments at Division and Corps, and multiple force management assignments on the Army staff, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, and the U.S. Army Recruiting Command. Professor Braun holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Alfred University and masters’ degrees from the USAWC in strategic studies, the School of Advanced Military Science in military art and science, and Webster University in business.


Recent Publications

Strategic Insights: ISIS in Libya: A Threat or a Dead-End?
Dr. Azeem Ibrahim
Prior to 1912, Libya was a province within the Ottoman Empire and subdivided into two regions (Tripolitania in the west and Cyrenaica in the east) reflecting a long-standing ethnic and geographic division in the country. Although not administered separately, the large region reaching south into the Sahara had a different ethnic make-up compared to the rest of the country and was more connected to sub-Saharan Africa than to the Mediterranean. Ottoman control in the south was limited to a few towns, which gave them some oversight of the trade routes; but by the start of the 20th century, Ottoman authority was notional rather than effective in this region.

Strategic Insights: Learning from the Military’s Weinstein Moment
Dr. Leonard Wong
Prior to 1912, Libya was a province within the Ottoman Empire and subdivided into two regions (Tripolitania in the west and Cyrenaica in the east) reflecting a long-standing ethnic and geographic division in the country. Although not administered separately, the large region reaching south into the Sahara had a different ethnic make-up compared to the rest of the country and was more connected to sub-Saharan Africa than to the Mediterranean. Ottoman control in the south was limited to a few towns, which gave them some oversight of the trade routes; but by the start of the 20th century, Ottoman authority was notional rather than effective in this region.


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The views expressed in this newsletter are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. This newsletter is cleared for public release; distribution is unlimited.

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