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Blind or Confused: The Impact of 9/11 and Its Aftermath on Risk | Freier

Blind or Confused:The Impact of 9/11 and Its Aftermath on Risk September 22, 2021 | Professor Nathan Freier STRATEGY WITHOUT RISK IS NOT STRATEGY In a defense and military security context, the United States has at times been “risk-blind” and, at others, “risk-confused” over the last two decades.1 These conditions likely predate the 9/11 attacks. But …

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Twenty Years after 9/11: The US Army at a Crossroads | Shatzer

Twenty Years after 9/11: The US Army at a Crossroads September 9, 2021   |  Colonel George Shatzer No retrospective on the September 11 attacks can escape the bleak pall cast by the tragic events unfolding in Afghanistan today. Despite the enormous financial investment in the country and the grim human costs borne by the United …

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The Best-Laid Plans Upended | Deni

The Best-Laid Plans Upended August 27, 2021  |  Dr. John R. Deni The American national security establishment is shifting from nation building to addressing the challenge of rising great powers, from a near obsession with the United States Central Command geographic area of responsibility to an emphasis on the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Sound familiar? This shift …

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9/11 and the Ethics of Fear: Maintaining the High Ground in the Face of Uncertainty | Pfaff

9/11 and the Ethics of Fear:Maintaining the High Ground in the Face of Uncertainty August 30, 2021  |  Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff INTRODUCTION The coordinated terrorist attacks on 9/11 took the lives of almost 3,000 people, destroyed $55 billion worth of infrastructure, and caused $123 billion in other economic impact.1 Perhaps just as tragically, the …

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Twenty Years after 9/11: Implications for US Policy in the Middle East | Bolan

Twenty Years after 9/11: Implications for US Policy in the Middle East August 31, 2021  |  Dr. Christopher J. Bolan The September 11 attacks represented a major strategic shock to US foreign policy in the Middle East. Whereas much of US foreign policy during the Cold War understandably focused on the global threats posed by …

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“Never Forget”: 9/11 Then and Now—Thoughts on Readiness | Lohmann

“Never Forget”: 9/11 Then and Now—Thoughts on Readiness August 31, 2021  |  Dr. Sarah Lohmann On the morning of September 11, 2001, I stopped by the post office on my way to the newsroom of the Washington, DC–based newspaper where I worked as an editorial writer. I wanted to mail a postcard of the World …

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“Après Nous, le Déluge” | Mason

“Après Nous, le Déluge”​ August 31, 2021 | Dr. Chris M. Mason The Taliban have retaken control of Afghanistan. The quixotic, United States-led, 20-year nation-building project in Afghanistan is over. “I . . . don’t think anyone thought Afghanistan would turn so badly so quick,” a US official is quoted as saying recently.1 If that …

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9/11 and the Army Reserve: The Strategic Shift | Lawrence

9/11 and the Army Reserve: The Strategic Shift August 31, 2021 | Colonel Matthew W. Lawrence The 9/11 attacks’ effects on the United States and its foreign policies cannot be understated. The United States, in essence, lost its innocence that day and has never been the same. The attacks spurred changes in the way the …

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9/11, Latin America, and the Impermanence of Strategic Concepts | Ellis

9/11, Latin America, and theImpermanence of Strategic Concepts September 7, 2021  |  Dr. R. Evan Ellis On September 11, 2001, then US President George W. Bush had just completed a historic summit with his Mexican counterpart, Vicente Fox, the week prior. The interaction built on the “special friendship” between the two nations and the intertwined …

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9/11, Post-Primacy, and Defense Strategy Development | Freier

9/11, Post-Primacy, andDefense Strategy Development September 7, 2021   |   Professor Nathan Freier INTRODUCTION: LAST FEW HOURS OF UNRIVALED PRIMACY September 2001 was Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and Defense Planning Guidance (DPG) season in the Pentagon. The QDR was the Bush-Rumsfeld DoD’s first crack at publicly reshaping the post–Cold War military.1 The DPG was the classified …

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The Lessons of 9/11 for Defense Planning | Cliff

The Lessons of 9/11 for Defense Planning September 8, 2021  |  Dr. Roger Cliff On the morning of September 11, 2001, I was working at the Pentagon in the office of the deputy assistant secretary of defense for strategy. The DoD was preparing to issue a report documenting the findings of the 2001 Quadrennial Defense …

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SSI Live 084 – Can the West get Counterinsurgency Right?

The fall of Afghanistan raises serious questions about whether the United States and the West more broadly are able to successfully implement what military practitioners call Foreign Internal Defense, or supporting a friendly foreign government under attack from an internal insurgency.  What explains success or failure in these cases?  SSI Live host Dr. John R. Deni invited his …

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SSI Live 083 – Explaining Afghanistan’s Downfall

How did Afghanistan fall to the Taliban after 20 years of effort by the United States and its allies?  SSI Live host Dr. John R. Deni invited his SSI colleagues Dr. Chris Mason to address the end of America’s longest war and to help shed light on the key reasons for why Afghanistan fell.  Dr. Mason drew on his …

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Parameters VOL. 51 NO. 2 Summer 2021

Parameters Summer 2021 Download the Full Issue In Focus: “Senior Leader Dissent”, Conrad C. Crane; “Two Sides of COIN”, M. Chris Mason and Darren Colby; “Allies and Partners”, Jean-Yves Haines, Cynthia Salloum, Tongifi Kim, Luis Simon; “Strategy and Doctrine”, Austin C. Doctor, James Walsh, Ann Mezzell, J. Wesley Hutto, Robert S. Ehlers Jr., Partrick Blannin …

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COL Jason P. Clark – “US Army Reforms in the Progressive Era”

Released 26 March 2021. A look back at F. Gunther Eyck’s assessment of reforms enacted under US Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson may reveal as much about the historiography of the early 1970s as it does about Stimson’s reform efforts themselves. Eyck’s 1971 evaluation, among the first in a decade of scholarship examining successes …

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Dr. Robert Hamilton — “Soviet Reform—Surprisingly Prescient”

Released 25 March 2021. Writing in 1971, economist Dr. John P. Hardt assessed the trajectory of the Soviet economy arguing the need for reform and evaluating the willingness of key actors in the Soviet bureaucracy to support such policies. Fifty years later, Hardt was remarkably prescient with regard to structural difficulties such reform posed and …

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Dr. Michael Neiberg — “Coalition Warfare—Echoes from the Past”

Released 23 March 2021. The dilemmas posed by coalition warfare were a subject of academic interest in the inaugural issue of Parameters in 1971. Lieutenant Colonel James B. Agnew examined the unified command model pursued by the Allies during the First World War. Agnew’s assessment of the challenges faced by French Marshal Ferdinand Foch speaks …

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Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff and Julia L. E. Pfaff — “Academe and the Military”

Released 19 March 2021. Differences between the academic and military communities and the dysfunction that occurs when these communities comingle can have disastrous consequences for foreign policy. Donald Bletz, writing on the subject in 1971, details this dynamic as it related to the Vietnam War. His observations can be applied to wars since and suggest …

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Dr. Leonard Wong and Dr. Stephen Gerras – “Veteran Disability Compensation and the Army Profession: Good Intentions Gone Awry”

Released 4 February 2021. Today, two-thirds of soldiers depart the US Army with a disability rating. Unfortunately, some soldiers are exploiting a generous disability system overextended beyond its original purposes and potentially damaging trust in the military, jeopardizing Army readiness, and encouraging a culture that erodes the Army’s notions of selfless service. Click here to …

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Dr. Christopher J. Bolan, COL Jerad I. Harper, and Dr. Joel R. Hillison – “Diverging Interests: US Strategy in the Middle East”

Released 3 February 2021. The novel coronavirus is only the latest in a series of global crises with implications for the regional order in the Middle East. These changes and the diverging interests of actors in the region have implications for US strategy and provide an opportunity to rethink key US relationships there. Click here …

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