Editorial Board

Editorial Board

Anne Louise Antonoff

Marine Corps University

Hal Brands

Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) ⯀ Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute

Douglas Bristol

General Buford "Buff" Blount Professor of Military History, 2021–2023, and Fellow of the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society, University of Southern Mississippi

Robert J. Bunker

Director of Research and Analysis of C/O Futures, LLC

Jeffrey Caton

President, Kepler Strategies, LLC

Samuel Charap

Senior Political Scientist at the RAND Corporation

Murray “Murf” R. Clark

Former US Army War College Senior Air Force Representative ⯀ Professor of Command, Leadership, and Management

Anne Louise Antonoff

Marine Corps University

Hal Brands

Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) ⯀ Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute

Douglas Bristol

General Buford "Buff" Blount Professor of Military History, 2021–2023, and Fellow of the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society, University of Southern Mississippi

Robert J. Bunker

Director of Research and Analysis of C/O Futures, LLC

Jeffrey Caton

President, Kepler Strategies, LLC

Samuel Charap

Senior Political Scientist at the RAND Corporation

Murray “Murf” R. Clark

Former US Army War College Senior Air Force Representative ⯀ Professor of Command, Leadership, and Management

Conrad C. Crane

Chief of Analysis and Research for the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks

Audrey Kurth Cronin

Distinguished Professor of International Security at American University

Conrad C. Crane

Chief of Analysis and Research for the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks

Audrey Kurth Cronin

Distinguished Professor of International Security at American University

Mark Eshelman

Retired Army Colonel, Professor in the Department of Distance Education at the US Army War College

David M. Finkelstein

Vice President at the Center for Naval Analyses ⯀ Director of the China and Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division at the Center for Naval Analyses

Thomas X. Hammes

Retired US Marine Corps Colonel

Stéfanie von Hlatky

Canada Research Chair on Gender, Security, and the Armed Forces

An Jacobs

Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Nottingham Trent University ⯀ Visiting Fellow in Diplomacy and International Governance at Loughborough University London

Nina Jankowicz

Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Genevieve Lester

De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the US Army War College

Chris Mason

Former Navy Officer. Associate Professor in the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College

Montgomery “Mitzy” McFate

Professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island

Jennifer Mittelstadt

Professor of History at Rutgers University

Andrew Monaghan

Founder and Director of the Russia Research Network Ltd.

Matthew Pinsker

Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania ⯀ Director of the House Divided Project

Mark Eshelman

Retired Army Colonel, Professor in the Department of Distance Education at the US Army War College

David M. Finkelstein

Vice President at the Center for Naval Analyses ⯀ Director of the China and Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division at the Center for Naval Analyses

Thomas X. Hammes

Retired US Marine Corps Colonel

Stéfanie von Hlatky

Canada Research Chair on Gender, Security, and the Armed Forces

An Jacobs

Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Nottingham Trent University ⯀ Visiting Fellow in Diplomacy and International Governance at Loughborough University London

Nina Jankowicz

Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Genevieve Lester

De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the US Army War College

Chris Mason

Former Navy Officer. Associate Professor in the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College

Montgomery “Mitzy” McFate

Professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island

Jennifer Mittelstadt

Professor of History at Rutgers University

Andrew Monaghan

Founder and Director of the Russia Research Network Ltd.

Matthew Pinsker

Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania ⯀ Director of the House Divided Project

George Reed

Retired US Army Colonel ⯀ Professor and Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

Bettina Renz

Professor of International Security in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham

Nadia Schadlow

Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute

George Reed

Retired US Army Colonel ⯀ Professor and Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

Bettina Renz

Professor of International Security in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham

Nadia Schadlow

Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute

Sibylle Scheipers

International Relations Chair at University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Andrew Scobell

Distinguished Fellow for China at the United States Institute of Peace ⯀ Adjunct Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University

Kalev I. Sepp

Senior Lecturer and Former Chair of the Defense Analysis Department at the Naval Postgraduate School

Luis Simón

Director of the Centre for Security, Diplomacy, and Strategy at the Brussels School of Governance (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) ⯀ Director of the Brussels Office of the Elcano Royal Institute

Samantha A. Taylor

Assistant Professor of Military and Security Studies in the Schriever Space Scholars Department of Spacepower at the Air Command and Staff College

Timothy L. Thomas

Analyst, MITRE Corporation

John F. Troxell

Retired US Army Colonel

Bert Tussing

Director of the Homeland Defense and Security Issues Group in the Center for Strategic Leadership at the US Army War College

Marybeth Peterson Ulrich

Professor of Government in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the US Army War College

Katarzyna Zysk

Professor of International Relations and Contemporary History at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College in Oslo

Sibylle Scheipers

International Relations Chair at University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Andrew Scobell

Distinguished Fellow for China at the United States Institute of Peace ⯀ Adjunct Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University

Kalev I. Sepp

Senior Lecturer and Former Chair of the Defense Analysis Department at the Naval Postgraduate School

Luis Simón

Director of the Centre for Security, Diplomacy, and Strategy at the Brussels School of Governance (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) ⯀ Director of the Brussels Office of the Elcano Royal Institute

Samantha A. Taylor

Assistant Professor of Military and Security Studies in the Schriever Space Scholars Department of Spacepower at the Air Command and Staff College

John F. Troxell

Retired US Army Colonel

Bert Tussing

Director of the Homeland Defense and Security Issues Group in the Center for Strategic Leadership at the US Army War College

Marybeth Peterson Ulrich

Professor of Government in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the US Army War College

Katarzyna Zysk

Professor of International Relations and Contemporary History at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College in Oslo

Anne Louise Antonoff

Marine Corps University

Biography pending.

Hal Brands

Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) ⯀ Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute

A columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, Brands is the author or editor of several books, including American Grand Strategy in the Age of Trump (2018), Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order (2016), What Good is Grand Strategy? Power and Purpose in American Statecraft from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush (2014), Latin America’s Cold War (2010), From Berlin to Baghdad: America’s Search for Purpose in the Post–Cold War World (2008), The Power of the Past: History and Statecraft (coedited with Jeremi Suri, 2015), and The Last Card: Inside George W. Bush’s Decision to Surge in Iraq (coedited with Jeffrey Engel, Timothy Sayle, and William Inboden, 2019). His newest books are The Lessons of Tragedy: Statecraft and World Order (2019), coauthored with Charles Edel, and COVID-19 and World Order (2020), coedited with Francis Gavin. 

Brands served as special assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Strategic Planning from 2015 to 2016. He has also served as lead writer for the Commission on the National Defense Strategy for the United States and consulted with a range of government offices and agencies in the intelligence and national security communities.

Douglas Bristol

General Buford “Buff” Blount Professor of Military History, 2021–2023, and Fellow of the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society, University of Southern Mississippi

Bristol is a historian of the African American experience, US race relations, and war and society with a focus on World War II. In 2002, he received his doctorate with distinction from the University of Maryland, where he studied under Ira Berlin. In his teaching and research, Bristol focuses on the beliefs, institutions, and strategies that ordinary Americans developed to exercise control over their lives.

He joined the University of Southern Mississippi history faculty in 2003, where he is a fellow of the Dale Center for the Study of War and Society. The Smithsonian, Duke University, and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library have awarded him post-doctoral fellowships. Bristol is the 2021 president of the Gulf South Historical Association. He has published two books: Knights of the Razor: Black Barbers in Slavery and Freedom (2015) and Integrating the U.S. Military: Race, Gender, and Sexuality since World War II (2017). His current book project is Behind the Front Lines: How Black GIs and WACs Helped Win World War II. Publications including the Christian Science Monitor and the New York Times, along with the PBS documentary Boss: The Black Experience in Business, have featured his interviews.

Robert J. Bunker

Director of Research and Analysis of C/O Futures, LLC

An international security and counterterrorism professional, Bunker was futurist in residence at the behavioral science unit at the Federal Bureau of Investigation Academy and Minerva Chair at the Strategic Studies Institute of the US Army War College. He has taught at American Military University, California State University San Bernardino, Claremont Graduate University, and the University of Southern California.

With over 500 publications across various fields and formats, Bunker has delivered hundreds of presentations—including US congressional testimony. He holds degrees in the fields of history, anthropology-geography, social science, behavioral science, government, and political science and has trained extensively in counterterrorism and counternarcotics.

Jeffrey Caton

President, Kepler Strategies, LLC

Caton is president of Kepler Strategies LLC, a veteran-owned small business specializing in national security, cyberspace theory, and aerospace technology. An intermittent professor of program management with Defense Acquisition University, Caton served on the US Army War College faculty from 2007–12, including as associate professor of cyberspace operations and defense transformation chair. Over the past decade, he has lectured on cyberspace and space issues related to international security in the United States, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Estonia, Kazakhstan, and the Czech Republic, supporting programs such as the Partnership for Peace Consortium and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Cooperative Cyber Defence Center of Excellence.

Caton, a retired colonel, served 28 years in the US Air Force, working in engineering, joint operations, and foreign military sales, as well as space and nuclear operations. He commanded at the squadron and group level. Caton holds a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a master’s degree in strategic studies from the Air War College.

Samuel Charap

Senior Political Scientist at the RAND Corporation

Dr. Samuel Charap is a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation. His research interests include the foreign and security policies of Russia and the former Soviet states; European and Eurasian regional security; and US-Russia deterrence, strategic stability, and arms control. From November 2012 until April 2017, Charap was the senior fellow for Russia and Eurasia at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Prior to joining the IISS, he was a CFR International Affairs Fellow at the US Department of State, where he served as senior advisor to the Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security and on the Secretary’s Policy Planning Staff, covering Russia and Eurasia. Charap’s book on the Ukraine crisis, Everyone Loses: The Ukraine Crisis and the Ruinous Contest for Post-Soviet Eurasia (coauthored with Timothy J. Colton), was published in January 2017. His articles have appeared in the Washington QuarterlyForeign AffairsSurvivalCurrent HistoryFinancial Times, the New York Times, and several other journals and newspapers. He holds a doctorate in political science and a master’s degree in Russian and East European studies from the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar.

Murray “Murf” R. Clark

Former US Army War College Senior Air Force Representative ⯀ Professor of Command, Leadership, and Management

In his 28-year career, Clark completed multiple assignments as a pilot, commander, and educator. He commanded at the squadron and group levels, including multiple deployments as an expeditionary commander. He completed professional military education at the US Air Force Squadron Officers School (distinguished graduate), the US Army’s Command and General Staff College, Air War College (by correspondence), and as a Secretary of Defense corporate fellow and Air Force fellow.

Clark holds degrees from the Air Force Academy (distinguished graduate; bachelor of science in literature, philosophy, and history – 1987) and Notre Dame (master of arts in language arts – 1996). His academic assignments included a return to the Air Force Academy as an assistant professor of English and a final assignment as the professor of aerospace studies and commander of the Air Force ROTC Detachment at Norwich University, where he served a term as the dean of the College of National Services. While assigned to the US Army War College, Clark completed additional work as an editor, coauthor, and guest speaker on leadership and change management. He is a lifetime member of the USAWC Alumni Association and now works as an airline pilot.

Conrad C. Crane

Chief of Analysis and Research for the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks

Crane is currently chief of analysis and research for the US Army Heritage and Education Center at Carlisle Barracks. He arrived at the Army War College in 2000 after a 26-year career in the Army. He has served in the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) and as the director of the Military History Institute. He holds a bachelor of science from the US Military Academy and a master of arts and PhD from Stanford University. He has authored or edited books and monographs on the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq, and has written and lectured widely on airpower and landpower issues.

Before leaving SSI, he coauthored a prewar study on reconstructing Iraq that influenced Army planners and has attracted much attention from the media. He was the lead author for the groundbreaking Army-USMC counterinsurgency manual which was released in December 2006. In November 2008, he was named the international Archivist of the Year by the Scone Foundation. He published two books in 2016, one for Naval Institute Press about the creation and application of American counterinsurgency doctrine, entitled Cassandra in Oz: Counterinsurgency and Future War, and another for University Press of Kansas titled American Airpower Strategy in World War II: Bombs, Cities, Civilians, and Oil. Also in 2016 he was awarded the Society for Military History Samuel Eliot Morison Prize for lifetime contributions to the field of military history.

Audrey Kurth Cronin

Distinguished Professor of International Security at American University

Cronin was a Marshall Scholar at Princeton University, earned a PhD from the University of Oxford, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. She has been director of the core course on war and statecraft at the National War College, director of studies for the Changing Character of War Program at Oxford University, and specialist in terrorism at the Congressional Research Service. She has also served in the office of the Secretary of Defense for policy and frequently advises at senior levels. Cronin was chairman of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Terrorism and is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Called a “landmark study” by the New Yorker, Cronin’s best-known book, published in 2009, is How Terrorism Ends: Understanding the Decline and Demise of Terrorist Campaigns. Her latest book, Power to the People: How Open Technological Innovation is Arming Tomorrow’s Terrorists (2020), analyzes emerging technologies and devises a new framework for twenty-first-century military innovation. In November 2020, the book won the international Airey Neave Book Prize for “the most significant, original, relevant, and practically valuable contribution to the understanding of terrorism.”

Mark Eshelman

Retired Army Colonel, Professor in the Department of Distance Education at the US Army War College

Eshelman served 30 years as an active-duty infantry officer. He has taught at the US Army War College since 2003, first with the Department of Command, Leadership, and Management, and since 2010 with the Department of Distance Education. He came to the War College as a practitioner with wartime and contingency planning experience at all levels from tactical (Operations Urgent Fury, Uphold Democracy, and Joint Guard) to the operational level of war (Operations Skilled Anvil, Enduring Freedom, and Iraqi Freedom) to the strategic level with the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Joint Staff Directorate (Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm).

Eshelman also has force development experience, having served on the Army Staff with the Force XXI Integration Division. He holds a bachelor of science from the US Military Academy, and he has graduate degrees from the Defense Intelligence College, the US Army Command and General Staff College, the School for Advanced Military Studies, and the US Army War College.

David M. Finkelstein

Vice President at the Center for Naval Analyses ⯀ Director of the China and Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division at the Center for Naval Analyses

A graduate of the US Military Academy, Finkelstein received a doctorate in Chinese and Japanese history from Princeton University and studied Mandarin at Nankai University in Tianjin, China.

Finkelstein is a member of the National Committee for US-China Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. A retired US Army officer, he has been involved in PRC and Asian security affairs throughout his career. He is the coeditor of multiple volumes on Chinese security and military affairs, including Chinese Warfighting: The PLA Experience Since 1949 (2003), China’s Revolution in Doctrinal Affairs: Developments in the Operational Art of the People’s Liberation Army (2002), Civil-Military Relations in Today’s China: Swimming in a New Sea (2015), and China’s Leadership in the 21st Century: The Rise of the Fourth Generation (2015). His historical monograph, Washington’s Taiwan Dilemma, 1949–1950: From Abandonment to Salvation, focuses on the roots of US postwar Taiwan policy. His paper, “Breaking the Paradigm: Drivers behind the PLA’s Current Period of Reform,” is the lead chapter in Chairman Xi Remakes the PLA: Assessing Chinese Military Reforms (2019).

Thomas X. Hammes

Retired US Marine Corps Colonel

In his 30 years in the Marine Corps, T. X. Hammes served at all levels in the operating forces, to include commanding a rifle company, a weapons company, an intelligence battalion, an infantry battalion, and the Chemical Biological Incident Response Force. He served as regimental S-2 and S-4, division G-3 training, G-3 operations, and G-3 plans, fleet plans, and MEF plans. He participated in stabilization operations in Somalia and Iraq and trained insurgents in various places. 

Hammes has a PhD in modern history from Oxford University and is currently a distinguished research fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National Defense University.

He is the author of three books, 20 book chapters, and over 170 articles. His latest book is Deglobalization and International Security (2020). Hammes lectures extensively on the future of conflict, emerging technology, strategy, and insurgency in the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. 

Stéfanie von Hlatky

Canada Research Chair on Gender, Security, and the Armed Forces

Hlatky is an associate professor of political studies at Queen’s University and the director of the Centre for International and Defence Policy. She is the cohost of the Canadian security and defence podcast Battle Rhythm and codirector of the Network for Strategic Analysis. She received her PhD in political science from Université de Montréal in 2010, where she was also executive director for the Centre for International Peace and Security Studies. She has held positions at Georgetown University, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Dartmouth College, ETH Zurich, and was a Fulbright Visiting Research Chair at the University of Southern California Center for Public Diplomacy.

Hlatky has published in the Canadian Journal of Political Science, the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Contemporary Security Policy, the Canadian International Journal, International Politics, the Journal of Global Security Studies, European Security, Asian Security, and the Journal of Transatlantic Studies. She published a book entitled American Allies in Times of War: The Great Asymmetry (2013), as well as four edited volumes, including The Future of US Extended Deterrence (coedited with Andreas Wenger, 2015) and Countering Violent Extremism and Terrorism: Assessing Domestic and International Strategies (2020).\

An Jacobs

Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Nottingham Trent University ⯀ Visiting Fellow in Diplomacy and International Governance at Loughborough University London

Before taking on her current role, Jacobs was a senior lecturer in defence and international affairs at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, England, for over five years. She has also worked as a political adviser for the European Union Rule of Law Mission in Kosovo and a senior researcher at the Center for Security Studies at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Jacobs has a PhD from Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom, and undergraduate degrees from Maastricht University, Netherlands, where she also worked as a junior lecturer in European studies.

Her research interests include the European Union’s common security and defence policy, security sector reform, conflict resolution, military education, and gender mainstreaming in peacebuilding. Jacobs has operational and fieldwork experience in a range of fragile and conflict-affected environments, including Kosovo, Ukraine, Congo, Burundi, Lebanon, and Palestine. She is passionate about policy-supportive research. 

Nina Jankowicz

Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Jankowicz studies the intersection of democracy and technology in Central and Eastern Europe. She is the author of How to Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict (2020).

Jankowicz has advised the Ukrainian government on strategic communications under the auspices of a Fulbright-Clinton Public Policy Fellowship. Her writing has been published by the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, and others. She is a frequent television and radio commentator on disinformation and Russian and Eastern European affairs. Prior to her Fulbright grant in Ukraine, Jankowicz managed democracy assistance programs to Russia and Belarus at the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs. She received her master of arts in Russian, Eurasian, and East European studies from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and her bachelor of arts from Bryn Mawr College.

Genevieve Lester

De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the US Army War College

Lester is the De Serio Chair of Strategic Intelligence at the US Army War College. Prior to this position, she was an assistant professor in the National Defense University’s Joint Special Operations Master of Arts Program at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. She was visiting faculty and faculty coordinator of both intelligence studies and analytic methods at the Security Studies Program, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University as well as a senior fellow at the Center for Security Studies also at Georgetown.

Working on risk and counterterrorism, Lester served as a research fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and an editor of the journal, International Affairs, based at Chatham House in London. A Fulbright Scholar at the Technical University in Berlin, she holds a PhD and master of arts in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, a master of arts in international economics/international law and organizations from Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, and a bachelor of arts in history from Carleton College.

Chris Mason

Former Navy Officer. Associate Professor in the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College

Mason is the director of the Study of Internal Conflict, now in its seventh year, an ongoing research program into the outcomes of post–World War II internal conflicts. He researches, writes, and teaches on insurgency, civil war, and unconventional warfare. Mason is the coauthor of the book The Future of U.S.–India Security Cooperation (2021), and author of numerous history books and articles, including No Sign until the Burst of Fire (2008), Strategic Lessons Unlearned (2016), a US Army War College Press publication, and Paramarine! (2003).  

A subject matter expert on South Asia, Mason began his professional engagement with the subcontinent as a foreign service officer with multiple assignments in the region. Before retirement from the Foreign Service in 2005, his last assignment was a combat tour of duty on the Afghan-Pakistan border in Paktika Province. Mason teaches two annual elective courses on the Vietnam War and insurgency and civil war. He holds a PhD in history from George Washington University and a master of military studies from Marine Corps University.

Montgomery “Mitzy” McFate

Professor at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island

As the senior social scientist, she helped develop the US Army’s Human Terrain System from a “good idea” to a $150 million-a-year Army program. McFate has held positions at RAND and the Institute for Defense Analyses and the US Navy’s Office of Naval Research, where she was awarded a distinguished public service award by the Secretary of the Navy. She has served on the Army Science Board and the Defense Science Board and was an instructor at the Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

McFate received a bachelor of arts from University of California, Berkeley, a PhD in anthropology from Yale University, and a juris doctorate from Harvard Law School. She is the editor of Social Science Goes to War (2015), and the author of Military Anthropology (2018). McFate was a key contributor to US Army Field Manual 3-24, Counterinsurgency and has published in such journals as Defense and Security Analysis, Journal of Small Wars & Insurgencies, and Joint Forces Quarterly.

Jennifer Mittelstadt

Professor of History at Rutgers University

Mittlestadt studies the twentieth-century United States, with broad interests in the state, politics, gender, social movements, the military, and the role of the United States in the world. 

She is the author of From Welfare to Workfare: The Unintended Consequences of Liberal Reform, 1945–1964 (2005) and The Rise of the Military Welfare State (2015) and the editor of the forthcoming The Military and the Market (2022). She has published articles and opinion pieces for War on the Rocks, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Vox, among others. Mittelstadt has held the Harold K. Johnson Chair in Military History at the US Army War College. She was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars and the Dorothy and Lewis Cullman Center at the New York Public Library.

Andrew Monaghan

Founder and Director of the Russia Research Network Ltd.

Monaghan is a senior associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute in London, a nonresident associate fellow in the research division at the NATO Defence College, and commissioning editor of the NATO Defence College’s Russian Studies series.

He was previously the director of research on Russia and northern European defence and security at the Oxford Changing Character of War Centre at Pembroke College and has held positions as senior research fellow in the Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House (2013–April 2017), academic visitor at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford (2013–15), and visiting senior research fellow at the INSS in the National Defense University, Washington, DC (2016–17). Monaghan has served as an expert witness to several parliamentary committees, including the UK’s National Security Strategy Committee, the House of Commons Defence and Foreign Affairs Select Committees, and NATO’s Parliamentary Assembly.

He is the author of Dealing with the Russians (2019), Power in Modern Russia: Strategy and Mobilisation (2017), and The New Politics of Russia – Interpreting Change (2016).

Matthew Pinsker

Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania ⯀ Director of the House Divided Project

Pinsker previously held visiting fellowships at New America Foundation, the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College, and the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. He graduated from Harvard College and received a PhD in modern history from the University of Oxford. He is the author of two books: Abraham Lincoln (2002), a volume in the American Presidents Reference Series, and Lincoln’s Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers’ Home (2003).  

Pinsker has also published widely on the history of American politics, contributing to the Journal of American History and several other academic journals and newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, and USA Today

He sits on the advisory boards of several historic organizations, such as the Ford’s Theatre Society, the Gettysburg Foundation, the National Civil War Museum, and President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home. 

George Reed

Retired US Army Colonel ⯀ Professor and Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

Reed joined the school in 2015 after eight years at the University of San Diego School of Leadership and Education Sciences. He was awarded a bachelor of science in criminal justice administration from the University of Central Missouri, a master of forensic science from George Washington University, and a PhD in public policy analysis and administration from Saint Louis University. He served for 27 years as a military police officer with his last assignment on active duty as a faculty member and director of command and leadership studies at the US Army War College. 

Bettina Renz

Professor of International Security in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham

Renz obtained her master of arts and master of science in Russian studies at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and completed her PhD at the Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, in 2005. Her major research expertise is Russian foreign, security, and defence policy in the post–Cold War era. She has published widely on military reforms, civil-military relations, and military operations other than war.

Russia’s Military Revival (2018) is her latest monograph. In the past, Renz was a lecturer in defence studies at the Royal Air Force College, United Kingdom, and a distinguished visiting professor at the Canadian Forces College in spring 2020.\

Nadia Schadlow

Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute

Schadlow was most recently US Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy. Prior to joining the National Security Council, she was a senior program officer in the International Security and Foreign Policy Program of the Smith Richardson Foundation, where she helped identify strategic issues warranting further attention from the US policy community. A full member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Schadlow served on the Defense Policy Board from September 2006 to June 2009.

Her articles have appeared in Parameters, the American Interest, the Wall Street JournalPhilanthropy, and several edited volumes. Schadlow holds a bachelor of arts in government and Soviet studies from Cornell University and a master of arts and a PhD from the Johns Hopkins Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

Sibylle Scheipers

International Relations Chair at University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

Scheipers joined the School of International Relations at St. Andrews in 2011 and has held the chair in international relations since 2018. She was director of studies for the University of Oxford Changing Character of War Programme between 2007 and 2011. Prior to that, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Chatham House, an international affairs think tank.

Her research interests include irregular warfare, the law of armed conflict, prisoners and detainees in war, and the work of Carl von Clausewitz. Her latest monograph is On Small War: Carl von Clausewitz and People’s War (2018).

Andrew Scobell

Distinguished Fellow for China at the United States Institute of Peace ⯀ Adjunct Professor in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University

Born and raised in Hong Kong, Scobell earned a doctorate in political science from Columbia University.

His previous positions include: senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation, Donald Bren Chair in Non-western Strategic Thought in the Krulak Center for Innovation and Future Warfare at Marine Corps University, associate professor of international affairs at the George H. W. Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University, and associate research professor in the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College.

Scobell’s publications include Chairman Xi Remakes the PLA: Assessing Chinese Military Reforms (2019), PLA Influence on China’s National Security Policymaking (2015), China’s Search for Security (2012), and China’s Use of Force: Beyond the Great Wall and the Long March (2003).

Kalev I. Sepp

Senior Lecturer and Former Chair of the Defense Analysis Department at the Naval Postgraduate School, 2009–present

Sepp served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Counterterrorism and as an expert member of the Baker-Hamilton Bipartisan Commission on Iraq. A US Army Special Forces officer, he earned the Combat Infantryman Badge in the Salvadoran Civil War. His other unit assignments include the 82nd Airborne Division, 2nd Ranger Battalion, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Germany, and 2nd Infantry Division in Korea, among others.

Sepp earned a PhD from Harvard University and a master’s degree in military art and science from the US Army Command and General Staff College. He was an assistant professor of history at the US Military Academy at West Point, a resident scholar at Harvard, and is now a senior lecturer at the Naval Postgraduate School, where he chaired the Defense Analysis Department.

His publications include: “Best Practices in Counterinsurgency,” in Military Review (May–June 2005), reprinted in Arabic, Spanish, and Portuguese; Weapon of Choice: U.S. Army Special Operations in Afghanistan, with R. Kiper, J. Schroder, and C. Briscoe (2003); and chapters in Assessing War: The Challenge of Measuring Success and Failure (2015); Leadership: The Warrior’s Art (2001); and War in Iraq: Planning and Execution (2007), among others. Sepp was named one of the “Ten Most Influential Counterinsurgency Thinkers” by Foreign Policy magazine (2009). He has appeared on PBS Newshour, CNN, CNNi, BBC, MSNBC, CBS, National Public Radio, and other national news programs.

Luis Simón

Director of the Centre for Security, Diplomacy, and Strategy at the Brussels School of Governance (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) ⯀ Director of the Brussels Office of the Elcano Royal Institute

Simón received his PhD from the University of London and held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Saltzman Institute for War and Peace Studies at Columbia University. His research has appeared in such journals as Security StudiesInternational Affairs, the Journal of Strategic Studies, Geopolitics, Survival, and the RUSI Journal

Samantha A. Taylor

Assistant Professor of Military and Security Studies in the Schriever Space Scholars Department of Spacepower at the Air Command and Staff College

Taylor joined the Air Command and Staff College in 2021, where she teaches war theory and joint warfighting. Previously, she taught courses on theories of war, national security policy, and strategy making at the US Army War College. At the US Naval War College, she taught courses on national security policy making and strategy making.

Taylor has PhD in US diplomatic, military, and cultural history with an emphasis on the Cold War to 1998 from the University of Southern Mississippi. She also studies twentieth-century European military, cultural, and diplomatic history; international relations; and mass communications. Her research examines the role of culture and ideas in the formation of national security policy and foreign policy, as well as the role of policymaker communications with domestic audiences, to understand how those communications are used to gain political support for policy decisions.

Timothy L. Thomas

Analyst, MITRE Corporation

Timothy L. Thomas is an analyst for the MITRE Corporation. He worked for 27 years at the Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He retired from the US Army as a lieutenant colonel in the summer of 1993.  Thomas received a BS from West Point and an MA from the University of Southern California.

He was a US Army Foreign Area Officer who specialized in Soviet/Russian studies. His military assignments included serving as the director of Soviet Studies at the US Army Russian Institute in Garmisch, Germany; as an inspector of Soviet tactical operations under the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe; and as a brigade S‑2 and company commander in the 82nd Airborne Division.

He has written on Russian and Chinese military affairs for the past several years and is the author of nine books on Russian and Chinese military issues.

John F. Troxell

Retired US Army Colonel

Troxell is a former research professor of national security and military strategy with the Strategic Studies Institute at the US Army War College. He also served at the War College as a professor of national security affairs with the Center for Strategic Leadership and as the director of national security studies in the Department of National Security and Strategy.

His Army assignments included: War Plans Division, Department of the Army; force planner for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy and Requirements; and chief, Engineer Plans Division, Combined Forces Command, Seoul, South Korea. Other military assignments included command of the 3rd Engineer Battalion, 24th Infantry Division, and service with the 1st, 43rd, and 293rd Engineer Battalions.

Troxell earned a bachelor’s degree from the United States Military Academy in 1974 and a master’s from the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, in 1982. He graduated from the US Army War College and served as the General George S. Patton Chair of Operational Research and Analysis and was recognized as a War College Distinguished Fellow in 2018.

Recent publications include “Geoeconomics,” Military Review, January–February 2018 and coeditor of Avoiding the Trap: U.S. Strategy and Policy for Competing in the Asia-Pacific Beyond the Rebalance, February 2018. Published book chapters include: “Presidential Decision Directive-56: A Glass Half Full,” in The Interagency and Counterinsurgency Warfare; “Sizing the Military in the Post–Cold War Era,” in United States Post–Cold War Defence Interests: A Review of the First Decade; and “Military Power and the Use of Force,” in the US Army War College Guide to National Security Policy and Strategy, as well as articles in Parameters, Military Review, and with the Strategic Studies Institute.

Bert Tussing

Director of the Homeland Defense and Security Issues Group in the Center for Strategic Leadership at the US Army War College

Tussing joined the Center for Strategic Leadership in October 1999 following nearly 25 years in the US Marine Corps. He is a distinguished graduate of both the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the Naval War College and holds master’s degrees in national security strategy and military strategic studies. Tussing has served on three defense science boards, the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Beyond  Goldwater-Nichols Study, and the senior advisory group for the Department of Defense “Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support.”

He is a member of the board of experts for the University of California – Irvine Center for Unconventional Security Affairs and the Pennsylvania State University Homeland Defense and Security Council. Tussing also serves on the board of advisers for Long Island University’s Homeland Security Management Institute and the board of advisers of the Preparedness Leadership Council. In 2009, he served on Department of Homeland Security’s Homeland Security Advisory Council, assisting in the development of the Department’s first Quadrennial Homeland Security Review. In 2013, he served on an advisory council for the Secretary of Homeland Security. In May 2014, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Northwestern State University in recognition of his work in homeland security, homeland defense, and educational initiatives surrounding those regimes.

Marybeth Peterson Ulrich

Professor of Government in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the US Army War College

Ulrich received her PhD in political science from the University of Illinois and a bachelor of science from the US Air Force Academy, where she was a distinguished graduate in the class of 1984. Her research interests are focused on strategic studies with a special emphasis on civil-military relations, European security, and national security democratization issues.

Among Ulrich’s many publications is the book Democratizing Communist Militaries: The Cases of the Czech and Russian Armed Forces (1999). She served 15 years on active duty and 15 years in the Air Force Reserve. Her military service included duty as a KC-135Q navigator and faculty duty in the Air Force Academy Department of Political Science. She also had assignments as a political-military affairs officer in the office of the Undersecretary of the Air Force for International Affairs and as a reserve air attaché in the Defense Intelligence Agency, serving in the Czech Republic and the Russian Federation. She retired with the rank of colonel. Ulrich is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Katarzyna Zysk

Professor of International Relations and Contemporary History at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, Norwegian Defence University College in Oslo

At the Institute for Defence Studies, Zysk also served as the deputy director, head of Centre for Security Policy, and director of research. In 2016, she was acting dean of the Norwegian Defence University College, where she teaches regularly. She was also a visiting scholar at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, at the Changing Character of War Centre at the University of Oxford, and research fellow at the Center for Naval Warfare Studies of the US Naval War College, where she also cooperated closely with the war-gaming department.

Currently, she serves as a nonresident research fellow at the Atlantic Council, a governing board member of the European Initiative for Security Studies, and a member of the International Military Council on Climate and Security. She focuses on security, defense, and strategic studies. Her published research has appeared in SAIS Review of International Affairs, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Journal of Strategic Studies, Asia Policy, RUSI Journal, Jane’s Navy International, War on the Rocks, and other journals and books.